The City Magazine Since 1975

Growing Prospects

October 2014
Growing Prospects
Today’s Holy City offers resources galore for those raising their own food and even keeping their own bees: places to plant, to grow one’s knowledge, and to learn from pros while lending a hand. Here, a look at the bounty


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Elliotborough Community Garden
Lease a plot in this downtown garden, or help out in the community beds. 134 Line St. (843) 724-5003, www.charlestonparksconservancy.org

Chicora Place Community Garden
North Charleston neighbors enjoy produce from this space that employs low-cost gardening techniques. Volunteers can harvest the smarts of Master Gardener Germaine Jenkins, who leads the project. 3107 N. Carolina Ave., North Charleston. (843) 276-8552, find them on Facebook.

Magnolia Park & Community Garden
Lease one of the 60 four- by eight-foot beds, assist with the community plots or help harvest for local food pantries, and learn from gardening classes in this inspiring space. 0 Sycamore Ave., West Ashley. (843) 724--5003, www.charlestonparksconservancy.org

Medway Park Community Garden
Contact Charleston Parks Conservancy to be added to the waiting list for a plot in their next community garden. 2101 Medway Rd., James Island. (843) 724--5003, www.charlestonparksconservancy.org

Charleston Area Beekeepers Association
This group promotes good beekeeping practices, supports declining honeybee populations, and educates all ages about the insect’s importance. Monthly meetings at Gage Hall, Unitarian Church, 4 Archdale St. www.charlestonbees.org

Charleston Community Bee Gardens
This nonprofit just established a community apiary at Sewee Visitor & Environmental Education Center—a place for beekeepers needing home for their hives. Find them on Facebook.

Charleston Horticultural Society
Get tips from the pros during lectures, classes, and workshops. Headquarters at 46 Windermere Blvd., West Ashley. (843) 579-9922, www.chashortsoc.org

Charleston Urban Growers Coalition
Launched last spring, this program seeks to create synergies among existing organizations like GrowFood Carolina and The Green Heart Project while helping home farmers connect. Find them on Facebook.

MUSC Urban Farm
A half-acre ”living classroom” hosts workshops, seminars, and volunteer workdays aimed at helping the community learn about sustainable agriculture and ”eating for health.” Corner of Bee & President sts. (843) 792-9536, www.musc.edu/urbanfarm

GrowFood Demo Garden
Need inspiration? Take a peek at the local food hub’s demo garden. 990 Morrison Dr. (843) 727-0091, www.growfoodcarolina.com

Clemson Extension
Contact the office with gardening queries and visit the website for loads of helpful info. Dedicated green thumbs can learn even more through the South Carolina Master Gardener program. 259 Meeting St. (843) 722-5940, www.clemson.edu/extension/county/charleston

Blue Pearl Farms
The farm’s knowledgeable owners lead blueberry-growing and beekeeping workshops. 9760 Randall Rd., McClellanville. (843) 887-3554, www.bluepearlfarms.com

Sweetgrass Garden
Learn as you work at this nonprofit farm, which cultivates fruit and veggies to donate to local charities. They keep bees, too, selling the honey to raise funds. 3121 Plow Ground Rd., John’s Island. (843) 330-7164, find them on Facebook.

Fields to Families
When local farms have extra bounty, this nonprofit sends folks out to pick the produce, then redistributes it to area agencies that feed the hungry. 222 W. Coleman Blvd., Mount Pleasant. (843) 388-2487, www.fieldstofamilies.org

Lowcountry Crop Mob
Join fellow volunteers for a day in the fields helping farmers tackle big jobs—from planting crops to building fences. The next mob is October 24 at DirtWorks Incubator Farm. Find them on Facebook.

The Green Heart Project
This nonprofit’s farms at Mitchell Elementary and Zucker Middle schools connect students to fresh fruits and vegetables with assistance from volunteers. (843) 714-1350, www.greenheartsc.org

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