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With five hotels under construction and 11 more approved and in the pipeline to add to the current inventory of nearly 4,500 rooms, can Charleston handle more tourism or will downtown livability need its own “Vacancy” sign?

2017 has arrived—along with the onslaught of well-intentioned resolutions to get fit once and for all. Set yourself up for success this year with advice from local exercise experts. whether you want to run, cycle, stretch, dance, or “HIIT it,” we’ve got a fitness regime to get your body moving!

CreativeMornings events awaken area audiences

Did you know Emmy-winning kids’ show The Inspectors is filmed here in Charleston? 

Thousands flock to Charleston’s Chanukah in the Square

Andra Watkins’s latest novel fuses historical fiction with time travel for a riveting story

A grassroots group builds community and inspires a love for nature in all ages

Finding natural beauty and winged wonders on Little St. Simons, a hunting lodge-turned-eco-minded getaway

Inside the new American College of the Building Arts

Millford Plantation celebrates its 175th anniversary with a string of special events 

Rarely viewed and never-before-seen works by Alice Ravenel Huger Smith, aka “Cousin Alice,” will be reunited at Middleton Place and the Edmondston-Alston House for a special exhibit this fall

Projekt CHARME fosters connections between Charleston and the German town of Haldensleben

The Sewee tribe of Native Americans was first to live along this waterway’s shores and gave it the name “Shemee” (meaning unknown). Its people valued the same sheltered deep water and easy accessibility to the harbor that attracted the Englishmen who began settling on the creek in the 1670s.

Perhaps the most notable change that will soon affect the creek is the multistory office building being erected at Coleman Boulevard and Mill Street. Colloquially referred to as the “Shem Creek Parking Garage,” its modern design and 55-foot height have been hotly contested for its nearness to the creek and historic district and for the way it will alter the area’s small-town, fishing-village aesthetic.